Feeding Guide Free Consultation

 

Baby’s first food is breast milk or infant formula. Breast milk is the perfect food and is made especially for your baby, but infant formula will provide adequate nutrition for them too.

 

Formula milk is made from modified cow’s milk, however it cannot mimic human breast milk; which is the most natural food for your baby. If you are not comfortable with breastfeeding or are not able to breastfeed you can still give your baby a good start with formula milk

 

Exclusive breastfeeding or infant formula is recommended for the first six months of a baby’s life. Complementary foods should be added when the baby is ready and breastfeeding or infant formula should continue until the baby is at least a year old. Ordinary cow’s milk is not suitable as your baby’s main drink before one year as it does not contain enough iron and nutrients for proper growth and is too high in sodium. Iron is critical for your baby’s healthy growth and development during the entire first year and a baby’s iron reserves start to run out at around 6 months. At 6 months of age, your baby requires different nutrients which are not covered by exclusive breastfeeding or infant milk; these nutrients are then provided by the complimentary food.

 

Infants are often developmentally ready to gradually accept complementary foods between four and six months of age. When ready for solid foods, your baby will be able to control head movements and sit with support. To show an interest in food, they will open their mouth and lean forward. When they have had enough to eat, they will lean back and turn away.

The first year of life is a time of rapid growth when most babies triple their birth weight. Make sure your baby gets the proper nourishment they need to develop to their fullest potential. Their fast-growing brain, along with their nervous system, continues to develop until about the age of three.

 

Feeding Practices

 

Breast Feed if Possible: Breast milk is best during the first year of life. If breastfeeding is not possible, infant formula is an acceptable alternative. Specialized formulas are available for infants that are allergic to regular infant formulas.

 

Heat Bottles Carefully: Some babies will drink a bottle straight from the refrigerator, but most prefer milk warmed to room temperature. Warm your baby’s bottle in one of these three ways.

  • Use a bottle warmer according to directions.
  • Hold it under a stream of warm tap water.
  • Put it in a pan of warm water that has been removed from the stovetop a few minutes.

Do not put baby bottles in the microwave, because microwaves can heat unevenly. The milk inside could reach scorching temperatures while the bottle may feel cool on the outside. In addition, some vitamins and protective factors in breast milk may be destroyed.

 

Hold Your Baby When Bottle-Feeding: At feeding time, you and your baby are learning about each other. Relax and hold your baby close. Babies can see things best when they are about 25 cm away, which is about the distance between your eyes and theirs when you hold them.

Talk to your baby while they nurse or bottle-feed. Babies whose parents talk to them learn more words than other children. Hug and cuddle your baby to help them feel secure, because sharing love is important for your baby’s health.

Hold Your Baby When Bottle-Feeding: At feeding time, you and your baby are learning about each other. Relax and hold your baby close. Babies can see things best when they are about 25 cm away, which is about the distance between your eyes and theirs when you hold them.

Talk to your baby while they nurse or bottle-feed. Babies whose parents talk to them learn more words than other children. Hug and cuddle your baby to help them feel secure, because sharing love is important for your baby’s health.

 

 

Our Pediatrics Doctors

Dr. ANWAR MOUSA
Consultant Pediatrician

Dr. ANWAR MOUSA

Consultant Pediatrician

Dr. ANWAR MOUSA

Dr. RAIN OSMAN
Consultant Pediatrician

Dr. RAIN OSMAN

Consultant Pediatrician

Dr. RAIN OSMAN